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American Unified School of Technology

Course Catalogue
(2016-2017)


American Unified School of Technology offers three courses:

  • K12 Comprehensive courses

  • K12 Honors courses, and

  • K12 AP® courses

In K12 Comprehensive courses, students do more extensive writing and research projects, and tackle problems that require more analytical thinking. Course projects and activities also demand more independent thinking and self-discipline than projects in Core courses.

K12 honours courses hold students to a greater degree of accountability, and demand even greater independence and self-discipline. Students synthesize and evaluate information and concepts from multiple sources and read texts typically assigned in college-level courses. Students also demonstrate college-level writing in essays that require analysis of primary and secondary sources, responsible use of evidence, and comprehensive citation of sources.

K12 AP® courses are college-level courses that follow curriculum specified by the College Board. These courses are designed to prepare students for success on AP exams, providing students the opportunity to earn credit at most of the nation’s colleges and universities. Our AP courses include a companion AP Exam Review course that provides practice for multiple choice exams and essay writing, as well as provides students an individualized study plan based on their results.


ENGLISH COURSES (these courses fulfil the English Credit Requirement)

 

ENG103: LITERARY ANALYSIS AND COMPOSITION I (COMPREHENSIVE)
 

This course challenges students to improve their written and oral communication skills, while strengthening their ability to understand and analyse literature in a variety of genres.

Literature: Students read a broad array of short stories, poetry, drama, novels, autobiographies, essays, and famous speeches. The course guides students in the close reading and critical analysis of classic works of literature, and helps them appreciate the texts and the contexts in which the works were written. Literary selections range from classic works such as Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet to contemporary pieces by authors such as Maya Angelou.

Language Skills: Students broaden their composition skills by examining model essays in various genres by student and published writers. Through in-depth planning, organizing, drafting, revising, proofreading, and feedback, they hone their writing skills. Students build on their grammar, usage, and mechanics skills with in-depth study of sentence analysis and structure, agreement, and punctuation, reinforced by online activities (Skills Updates). Student vocabularies are enhanced through the study of Greek and Latin root words, improving students’ ability to decipher the meanings of new words.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: Classics for Young Readers, Volume 8; Classics for Young Readers, Volume 8: An Audio Companion; BK English Language Handbook, Level 1; Vocabulary from Classical Roots, Book C; The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave by Frederick Douglass; Anne Frank: Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank; Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare
Prerequisites: K12 Intermediate English A and B (or equivalent)

Note: Students who have already succeeded in K12 middle school Literary Analysis and Composition should not enrol in this course.

 

ENG104: honourS LITERARY ANALYSIS AND COMPOSITION I

This course challenges students to improve their written and oral communication skills, while strengthening their ability to understand and analyse literature in a variety of genres. Students enrolled in this course work on independent projects that enhance their skills and challenge them to consider complex ideas and apply the knowledge they have learned.

Literature: Students read a broad array of short stories, poetry, drama, novels, autobiographies, essays, and famous speeches. The course guides students in the close reading and critical analysis of classic works of literature, and helps them appreciate the texts and the contexts in which the works were written. Literary selections range from the Greek tragedy Antigen to Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet to contemporary pieces by authors such as Annie Dillard and Maya Angelou.

Language Skills: Students broaden their composition skills by examining model essays in various genres by student and published writers. Through in-depth planning, organizing, drafting, revising, proofreading, and feedback, they hone their writing skills. Students build on their grammar, usage, and mechanics skills with in-depth study of sentence analysis and structure, agreement, and punctuation, reinforced by online activities. Student vocabularies are enhanced through the study of Greek and Latin root words, improving students’ ability to decipher the meanings of new words.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: Classics for Young Readers, Volume 8; Classics for Young Readers, Volume 8: An Audio Companion; BK English Language Handbook, Level 1; Vocabulary from Classical Roots, Book C; The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave by Frederick Douglass; Anne Frank: Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank; Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare
Prerequisites: Success in K12 Intermediate English A and B (or equivalent) and teacher/school counsellor recommendation

Note: Students who have already succeeded in K12 middle school Literary Analysis and Composition should not enroll in this course.


ENG203: LITERARY ANALYSIS AND COMPOSITION II (COMPREHENSIVE)

In this course, students build on existing literature and composition skills and move to higher levels of sophistication.

Literature: Students hone their skills of literary analysis by reading short stories, poetry, drama, novels, and works of nonfiction, both classic and modern. Authors include W. B. Yeats, Sara Teasdale, Langston Hughes, Robert Frost, Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Kate Chopin, Amy Tan, and Richard Rodriguez. Students read Shakespeare’s Macbeth. They are offered a choice of novels and longer works to study, including works by Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, Elie Wiesel, and many others.

Language Skills: In this course, students become more proficient writers and readers. In composition lessons, students analyse model essays from readers’ and writers’ perspectives, focusing on ideas and content, structure and organization, style, word choice, and tone. Students receive feedback during the writing process to help them work toward a polished final draft. In addition to writing formal essays, resumes, and business letters, students write and deliver a persuasive speech. Students expand their knowledge of grammar, usage, and mechanics through sentence analysis and structure, syntax, agreement, and conventions. Unit pretests identify skills to address more fully. Students strengthen their vocabularies through thematic units focused on word roots, suffixes and prefixes, context clues, and other important vocabulary-building strategies.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: Journeys in Literature: Classic and Modern, Volume B; Journeys in Literature: Classic and Modern, Volume B: An Audio Companion; Vocabulary for Achievement, Fourth Course; Macbeth by William Shakespeare

 

Prerequisites: ENG103: Literary Analysis and Composition I (or equivalent)

 

ENG204: honourS LITERARY ANALYSIS AND COMPOSITION II

In this course, students build on existing literature and composition skills and move on to higher levels of sophistication. Students work on independent projects that enhance their skills and challenge them to consider complex ideas and apply the knowledge they have learned.

Literature: Students hone their skills of literary analysis by reading short stories, poetry, drama, novels, and works of nonfiction, both classic and modern. Authors include W. B. Yeats, Sara Teasdale, Langston Hughes, Robert Frost, Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Kate Chopin, Amy Tan, Richard Rodriguez, and William Shakespeare. Students have a choice of novels and longer works to study, including works by Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, and Elie Wiesel.

Language Skills: In this course, students become more proficient writers and readers. In composition lessons, students analyse model essays from readers' and writers’ perspectives, focusing on ideas and content, structure and organization, style, word choice, and tone. Students receive feedback during the writing process to help them work toward a polished final draft. In addition to writing formal essays, resumes, and business letters, students write and deliver a persuasive speech. Students expand their knowledge of grammar, usage, and mechanics through sentence analysis and structure, syntax, agreement, and conventions. Unit pretests identify skills to address more fully. Students strengthen their vocabularies through thematic units focused on word roots, suffixes and prefixes, context clues, and other important vocabulary-building strategies.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: Journeys in Literature: Classic and Modern , Volume B; Journeys in Literature: Classic and Modern, Volume B: An Audio Companion; Vocabulary for Achievement, Fourth Course; Macbeth by William Shakespeare

Prerequisites: Success in ENG104: honours Literary Analysis and Composition I (or equivalent) and teacher/school counsellor recommendation


ENG303: AMERICAN LITERATURE (COMPREHENSIVE)

In this course, students read and analyse works of American literature from colonial to contemporary times, including poetry, short stories, novels, drama, and non-fiction. The literary works provide opportunities for critical writing, creative projects, and online discussions. Students develop vocabulary skills and refresh their knowledge of grammar, usage, and mechanics in preparation for standardized tests.
Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: Journeys in Literature: American Traditions, Volume C; The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald; The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams. Students will also read one selection of their choice from the following: The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway; The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros; A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest Gaines; The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane
 

Prerequisites: ENG203: Literary Analysis and Composition II (or equivalent)


ENG304: honourS AMERICAN LITERATURE

In this course, students read and analyse works of American literature from colonial to contemporary times, including poetry, short stories, novels, drama, and non-fiction. The literary works provide opportunities for critical writing, creative projects, and online discussions. Students develop vocabulary skills and refresh their knowledge of grammar, usage, and mechanics in preparation for standardized tests. Students enrolled in this challenging course will also complete independent projects that deepen their understanding of the themes and ideas presented in the curriculum.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: Journeys in Literature: American Traditions, Volume C; The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald; The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams. Students will also read one selection of their choice from the following: The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway; The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros; A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest Gaines; The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane; and two selections of their choice from the following: Billy Budd by Herman Melville; A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court by Mark Twain; Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger; Song of Solomon by Toni Morrison

Prerequisites: Success in ENG204: honours Literary Analysis and Composition II (or equivalent) and teacher/school counsellor recommendation


ENG403: BRITISH AND WORLD LITERATURE (COMPREHENSIVE)

Students read selections from British and world literature in a loosely organized chronological framework. They analyse the themes, styles, and structures of these texts and make thematic connections among diverse authors, periods, and settings. Students complete guided and independent writing assignments that refine their analytical skills. They have opportunities for creative expression in projects of their choice. Students also practice test-taking skills for standardized assessments in critical reading and writing.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.
Materials: Journeys in Literature: British and World Classics; Hamlet by William Shakespeare

Prerequisites: ENG303: American Literature (or equivalent)


ENG404: honourS BRITISH AND WORLD LITERATURE

Students read selections from British and world literature in a loosely organized chronological framework. They analyse the themes, styles, and structures of these texts and make thematic connections among diverse authors, periods, and settings. Students work independently on many of their analyses and engage in creative collaboration with their peers. Students also practice test-taking skills for standardized assessments in critical reading and writing.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: Journeys in Literature: British and World Classics; Hamlet by William Shakespeare

Prerequisites: ENG304: honours American Literature (or equivalent), and teacher/school counsellor recommendation


ENG500: AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION

Students learn to understand and analyse complex works by a variety of authors. They explore the richness of language, including syntax, imitation, word choice, and tone. They also learn composition style and process, starting with exploration, planning, and writing. This continues with editing, peer review, rewriting, polishing, and applying what they learn to academic, personal, and professional contexts. In this equivalent of an introductory college-level survey class, students prepare for the AP exam and for further study in communications, creative writing, journalism, literature, and composition.

Course Length: Two semesters

Materials: The Norton Reader: An Anthology of Non-fiction, 13th ed.; Writing: A College Handbook, 5th ed.
Prerequisites: ENG304: honours American Literature (or equivalent), and teacher/school counsellor recommendation


ENG510: AP ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION

In this course, the equivalent of an introductory college-level survey class, students are immersed in novels, plays, poems, and short stories from various periods. Students read and write daily, using a variety of multimedia and interactive activities, interpretive writing assignments, and discussions. The course places special emphasis on reading comprehension, structural and critical analyses of written works, literary vocabulary, and recognizing and understanding literary devices. Students prepare for the AP Exam and for further study in creative writing, communications, journalism, literature, and composition.

Course Length: Two semesters

Materials: Required (both semesters): The Norton Anthology of Poetry, 5th ed.; The Story and Its Writer: An Introduction to Short Fiction, compact 7th ed. Required (first semester): Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston; Hedda Gabler by Henrik Ibsen; A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams; Twelfth Night by William Shakespeare Required (second semester): The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald; Annie John by Jamaica Kincaid; Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

Prerequisites: ENG304: honours American Literature (or equivalent), and teacher/school counsellor recommendation



MATH COURSES (these courses fulfil the Maths Credit Requirement)

MTH123: ALGEBRA I (COMPREHENSIVE)

Students develop algebraic fluency by learning the skills needed to solve equations and perform manipulations with numbers, variables, equations, and inequalities. They also learn concepts central to the abstraction and generalization that algebra makes possible. Topics include simplifying expressions involving variables, fractions, exponents, and radicals; working with integers, rational numbers, and irrational numbers; graphing and solving equations and inequalities; using factoring, formulas, and other techniques to solve quadratic and other polynomial equations; formulating valid mathematical arguments using various types of reasoning; and translating word problems into mathematical equations and then using the equations to solve the original problems. Compared to MTH122, this course has a more rigorous pace and more challenging assignments and assessments. It covers additional topics including translating functions, higher degree roots, and more complex factoring techniques.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: Algebra I: Reference Guide and Problem Sets

Prerequisites: K12 Pre-Algebra, MTH113: Pre-Algebra (or equivalent)


Note: Students who have already succeeded in K12 middle school Algebra I should not enroll in this course.

 

MTH124: honourS ALGEBRA I

This course prepares students for more advanced courses while they develop algebraic fluency, learn the skills needed to solve equations, and perform manipulations with numbers, variables, equations, and inequalities. They also learn concepts central to the abstraction and generalization that algebra makes possible. Topics include simplifying expressions involving variables, fractions, exponents, and radicals; working with integers, rational numbers, and irrational numbers; graphing and solving equations and inequalities; using factoring, formulas, and other techniques to solve quadratic and other polynomial equations; formulating valid mathematical arguments using various types of reasoning; and translating word problems into mathematical equations and then using the equations to solve the original problems. This course includes all the topics in MTH123, but includes more challenging assignments and optional challenge activities. Each semester also includes an independent honours project.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: Algebra I: Reference Guide and Problem Sets

Prerequisites: Success in previous maths course and teacher/school counsellor recommendation


Note: Students who have already succeeded in K12 middle school Algebra I should not enroll in this course.



MTH203: GEOMETRY (COMPREHENSIVE)

In this comprehensive course, students are challenged to recognize and work with geometric concepts in various contexts. They build on ideas of inductive and deductive reasoning, logic, concepts, and techniques of Euclidean plane and solid geometry. They develop deeper understandings of mathematical structure, method, and applications of Euclidean plane and solid geometry. Students use visualizations, spatial reasoning, and geometric modelling to solve problems. Topics of study include points, lines, and angles; triangles; right triangles; quadrilaterals and other polygons; circles; coordinate geometry; three-dimensional solids; geometric constructions; symmetry; the use of transformations; and non-Euclidean geometries.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: Geometry: A Reference Guide; a drawing compass, protractor, and ruler

Prerequisites: MTH123: Algebra I (or equivalent)



MTH204: honourS GEOMETRY

Students work with advanced geometric concepts in various contexts. They build in-depth ideas of inductive and deductive reasoning, logic, concepts, and techniques of Euclidean plane and solid geometry. They also develop a sophisticated understanding of mathematical structure, method, and applications of Euclidean plane and solid geometry. Students use visualizations, spatial reasoning, and geometric modelling to solve problems. Topics of study include points, lines, and angles; triangles; right triangles; quadrilaterals and other polygons; circles; coordinate geometry; three-dimensional solids; geometric constructions; symmetry; the use of transformations; and non-Euclidean geometries. Students work on additional challenging assignments, assessments, and research projects.
Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: Geometry: A Reference Guide; a drawing compass, protractor, and ruler

Prerequisites: MTH123: Algebra I or MTH124: honours Algebra I (or equivalent) and teacher/school counsellor recommendation


MTH303: ALGEBRA II (COMPREHENSIVE)

This course builds upon algebraic concepts covered in Algebra I and prepares students for advanced-level courses. Students extend their knowledge and understanding by solving open-ended problems and thinking critically. Topics include conic sections; functions and their graphs; quadratic functions; inverse functions; and advanced polynomial functions. Students are introduced to rational, radical, exponential, and logarithmic functions; sequences and series; and data analysis.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: Algebra II: A Reference Guide and Problem Sets ; Texas Instruments T1-84 Plus graphing calculator

Prerequisites: MTH123: Algebra I and MTH203: Geometry (or equivalents)



MTH304: honourS ALGEBRA II

This course builds upon advanced algebraic concepts covered in Algebra I and prepares students for advanced-level courses. Students extend their knowledge and understanding by solving open-ended problems and thinking critically. Topics include functions and their graphs; quadratic functions; complex numbers, and advanced polynomial functions. Students are introduced to rational, radical, exponential, and logarithmic functions; sequences and series; probability; statistics; and conic sections. Students work on additional challenging assignments, assessments, and research projects.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: Algebra II: A Reference Guide and Problem Sets; Texas Instruments T1-84 Plus graphing calculator

Prerequisites: MTH123 or MTH124 (honours): Algebra I and MTH203 or MTH204 (honours): Geometry (or equivalents) and teacher/school counsellor recommendation



MTH403: PRE-CALCULUS/TRIGONOMETRY (COMPREHENSIVE)

Pre-calculus weaves together previous study of algebra, geometry, and functions into a preparatory course for calculus. The course focuses on the mastery of critical skills and exposure to new skills necessary for success in subsequent math courses. Topics include linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, radical, polynomial, and rational functions; systems of equations; and conic sections in the first semester. The second semester covers trigonometric ratios and functions; inverse trigonometric functions; applications of trigonometry, including vectors and laws of cosine and sine; polar functions and notation; and arithmetic of complex numbers. Cross-curricular connections are made throughout the course to calculus, art, history, and a variety of other fields related to mathematics.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: Texas Instruments T1-84 Plus graphing calculator

Prerequisites: MTH203: Geometry and MTH303: Algebra II (or equivalents)



MTH413: PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS (COMPREHENSIVE)

Students learn counting methods, probability, descriptive statistics, graphs of data, the normal curve, statistical inference, and linear regression. Proficiency is measured through frequent online and off-line assessments, as well as asynchronous discussions. Problem solving activities provide an opportunity for students to demonstrate their skills in real world situations.

Course Length: One semester

Materials: Probability and Statistics: Reference Guide and Problem Sets

Prerequisites: MTH 303: Algebra II (or equivalent)



MTH500: AP CALCULUS AB

This course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level calculus course. Calculus helps scientists, engineers, and financial analysts understand the complex relationships behind real-world phenomena. Students learn to evaluate the soundness of proposed solutions and apply mathematical reasoning to real-world models. Students also learn to understand change geometrically and visually (by studying graphs of curves), analytically (by studying and working with mathematical formulas), numerically (by seeing patterns in sets of numbers), and verbally. Students prepare for the AP exam and further studies in science, engineering, and mathematics.

Course Length: Two semesters

Materials: Texas Instruments T1-84 Plus graphing calculator

Prerequisites: Success in MTH204: honours Geometry, MTH304: honours Algebra II, MTH403: Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry (or equivalents), and teacher/ school counsellor recommendation



MTH510: AP STATISTICS

This course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level course. Statistics - the art of drawing conclusions from imperfect data and the science of real-world uncertainties - plays an important role in many fields. Students collect, analyse, graph, and interpret real-world data. They learn to design and analyse research studies by reviewing and evaluating examples from real research. Students prepare for the AP exam and for further study in science, sociology, medicine, engineering, political science, geography, and business.

Course Length: Two semesters

Materials: Texas Instruments T1-84 Plus graphing calculator

Prerequisites: Success in MTH304: honours Algebra II (or equivalent) and teacher/school counsellor recommendation



MTH520: AP CALCULUS BC (NEW)

This course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level calculus course. In this course, students study functions, limits, derivatives, integrals, and infinite series. Calculus helps scientists, engineers, and financial analysts understand the complex relationships behind real-world phenomena. Students learn to evaluate the soundness of proposed solutions and apply mathematical reasoning to real-world models. Students also learn to understand change geometrically and visually (by studying graphs of curves), analytically (by studying and working with mathematical formulas), numerically (by seeing patterns in sets of numbers), and verbally. Students prepare for the AP Exam and further studies in science, engineering, and mathematics.

Course Length: Two semesters

Materials: Texas Instruments T1-84 Plus graphing calculator

Prerequisites: Success in MTH204: honours Geometry, MTH304: honours Algebra II, MTH403: Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry (or equivalents), and teacher/school counsellor recommendation



SCIENCE COURSES (these courses fulfil the Science Credit Requirement)

SCI113: EARTH SCIENCE (COMPREHENSIVE)

This course provides students with a comprehensive earth science curriculum, focusing on geology, oceanography, astronomy, weather, and climate. The program consists of in-depth online lessons, an associated reference book, collaborative activities, virtual laboratories, and hands-on laboratories students can conduct at home. The course prepares students for further studies in geology, meteorology, oceanography, and astronomy courses, and gives them practical experience in implementing scientific methods.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: Earth Science: A Reference Guide

Prerequisites: K12 middle school Life Science (or equivalent)


SCI114: honourS EARTH SCIENCE

This challenging course provides students with an honours-level earth science curriculum, focusing on geology, oceanography, astronomy, weather, and climate. The program consists of online lessons, an associated reference book, collaborative activities, and hands-on laboratories students can conduct at home. The course prepares students for advanced studies in geology, meteorology, oceanography, and astronomy courses, and gives them more sophisticated experience in implementing scientific methods. Additional honours assignments include debates, research papers, extended collaborative laboratories, and virtual laboratories.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: Earth Science: A Reference Guide

Prerequisites: K12 middle school Earth Science (or equivalent), success in previous science course, and teacher/school counsellor recommendation



SCI203: BIOLOGY (COMPREHENSIVE)

In this comprehensive course, students investigate the chemistry of living things: the cell, genetics, evolution, the structure and function of living things, and ecology. The program consists of in-depth online lessons including extensive animations, an associated reference book, collaborative explorations, virtual laboratories, and hands-on laboratory experiments students can conduct at home.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: Biology: A Reference Guide

Prerequisites: K12 middle school Life Science (or equivalent)



SCI204: honourS BIOLOGY

This course provides students with a challenging honours-level biology curriculum, focusing on the chemistry of living things: the cell, genetics, evolution, the structure and function of living things, and ecology. The program consists of advanced online lessons including extensive animations, an associated reference book, collaborative explorations, and hands-on laboratory experiments students can conduct at home. honours activities include debates, research papers, extended collaborative laboratories, and virtual laboratories.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: Biology: A Reference Guide

Prerequisites: K12 middle school Life Science (or equivalent), success in previous science course, and teacher/school counsellor recommendation



SCI303: CHEMISTRY (COMPREHENSIVE)

This comprehensive course gives students a solid basis to move on to future studies. The course provides an in-depth survey of all key areas, including atomic structure, chemical bonding and reactions, solutions, stoichiometry, thermo-chemistry, organic chemistry, and nuclear chemistry. The course includes direct online instruction, virtual laboratories, and related assessments, used with a problem-solving book.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: Chemistry: Problems and Solutions

Prerequisites: SCI203: Comprehensive Biology and MTH123: Comprehensive Algebra I (or equivalents) and enrolled in MTH303 Comprehensive Algebra II



SCI304: honourS CHEMISTRY

This advanced course gives students a solid basis to move on to more advanced courses. The challenging course surveys all key areas, including atomic structure, chemical bonding and reactions, solutions, thermo-chemistry, organic chemistry, and nuclear chemistry, enhanced with challenging model problems and assessments. Students complete community-based written research projects, treat aspects of chemistry that require individual research and reporting, and participate in online threaded discussions.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: Chemistry: Problems and Solutions

Prerequisites: SCI203: Comprehensive Biology and MTH123: Comprehensive Algebra I (or equivalents) and enrolled in MTH303 Comprehensive Algebra II



SCI403: PHYSICS (COMPREHENSIVE)

This course provides a comprehensive survey of all key areas: physical systems, measurement, kinematics, dynamics, momentum, energy, thermodynamics, waves, electricity, and magnetism, and introduces students to modern physics topics such as quantum theory and the atomic nucleus. The course gives students a solid basis to move on to more advanced courses later in their academic careers. The program consists of online instruction, virtual laboratories, and related assessments, plus an associated problem-solving book.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: Physics: Problems and Solutions

Prerequisites: MTH303: Algebra II and MTH403: Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry (or equivalents)



SCI404: honourS PHYSICS

This advanced course surveys all key areas: physical systems, measurement, kinematics, dynamics, momentum, energy, thermodynamics, waves, electricity, and magnetism, and introduces students to modern physics topics such as quantum theory and the atomic nucleus. Additional honours assignments include debates, research papers, extended collaborative laboratories, and virtual laboratories. The course gives a solid basis for moving on to more advanced college physics courses. The program consists of online instruction, virtual laboratories, and related assessments, plus an associated problem-solving book.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: Physics: Problems and Solutions

Prerequisites: MTH303: Algebra II or MTH304: honours Algebra II and MTH403: Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry (or equivalents) and teacher/school counsellor recommendation


SCI500: AP BIOLOGY

This course guides students to a deeper understanding of biological concepts including the diversity and unity of life, energy and the processes of life, homoeostasis, and genetics. Students learn about regulation, communication, and signalling in living organisms, as well as interactions of biological systems. Students carry out a number of learning activities, including readings, interactive exercises, extension activities, hands-on laboratory experiments, and practice assessments. These activities are designed to help students gain an understanding of the science process and critical-thinking skills necessary to answer questions on the AP Biology Exam. The content aligns to the sequence of topics recommended by the College Board.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: Common household materials for labs

Prerequisites: Success in SCI204: honours Biology, SCI303: Comprehensive Chemistry, MTH304: honours Algebra II (or equivalents), and teacher/school counsellor recommendation required


SCI510: AP CHEMISTRY (NEW)

Students solve chemical problems by using mathematical formulation principles and chemical calculations in addition to laboratory experiments. They build on their general understanding of chemical principles and engage in a more in-depth study of the nature and reactivity of matter. Students focus on the structure of atoms, molecules, and ions, and then go on to analyse the relationship between molecular structure and chemical and physical properties. To investigate this relationship, students examine the molecular composition of common substances and learn to transform them through chemical reactions with increasingly predictable outcomes. Students prepare for the AP exam. The course content aligns to the sequence of topics recommended by the College Board.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: If hands-on labs are required, materials for lab experiments must be acquired by students

Prerequisites: Success in SCI304: honours Chemistry and MTH304: honours Algebra II (or equivalents), and teacher/school counsellor recommendation



SCI520: AP PHYSICS B

This course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level survey course, but does not require proficiency in calculus. Students focus on five general areas: Newtonian mechanics, thermal physics, electricity and magnetism, waves and optics, and atomic and nuclear physics. Students gain an understanding of the core principles of physics and then apply them to problem-solving exercises. They learn how to measure the mass of a planet without weighing it, find out how electricity makes a motor turn, and learn how opticians know how to shape lenses for glasses. Students prepare for the AP exam and for further study in science and engineering.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: Schaum’s Outline of College Physics,by Bueche and Hecht, 11th ed.; other editions acceptable; materials for laboratory experiments; a graphing calculator is recommended to prepare for the AP exam (supplied by school or student).

Prerequisites: Success in MTH304: honours Algebra II, MTH403: Pre- Calculus/Trigonometry (or equivalents), SCI404: honours Physics and teacher/school counsellor recommendation



SCI530-AVT: AP ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Students examine the natural world’s interrelationships in AP Environmental Science. During this two-semester course, they identify and analyse environmental problems and their effects and evaluate the effectiveness of proposed solutions. They learn to think like environmental scientists as they make predictions based on observation, write hypotheses, design and complete field studies and experiments, and reach conclusions based on the analysis of resulting data. Students apply the concepts of environmental science to their everyday experiences, current events, and issues in science, politics, and society. The course provides opportunities for guided inquiry and student-centered learning that build critical thinking skills. Prerequisites for enrollment include two years of prior coursework in laboratory sciences (Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, or Physics).


Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: Living in the Environment - 17th Edition; AP Environmental Science Lab Kit

Prerequisites: Success in two years of laboratory sciences in the following (or equivalents): usually SCI114 honours Earth Science and either SCI204 or SCI500 (AP): Biology, and either SCI304 or SCI510 (AP): Chemistry or SCI404 or SCI520 (AP): Physics; and MTH124: honours Algebra I and teacher/school counsellor recommendation





HISTORY COURSES (these courses fulfil the History Credit Requirement)


HST103: WORLD HISTORY (COMPREHENSIVE)

In this comprehensive survey of world history from prehistoric to modern times, students focus in depth on the developments and events that have shaped civilization across time. The course is organized chronologically and, within broad eras, regionally. Lessons address developments in religion, philosophy, the arts, science and technology, and political history. The course also introduces geography concepts and skills within the context of the historical narrative. Online lessons and assessments complement World History: Our Human Story, a textbook written and published by K12. Students are challenged to consider topics in depth as they analyse primary sources and maps, create time-lines, and complete other projects—practising historical thinking and writing skills as they explore the broad themes and big ideas of human history.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: World History: Our Human Story

Prerequisites: K12 middle school American History A, World History A or World History B (or equivalents)



HST104: honourS WORLD HISTORY

In this challenging survey of world history from prehistoric to modern times, students focus in-depth on the developments and events that have shaped civilization across time. The course is organized chronologically and, within broad eras, regionally. Lessons address developments in religion, philosophy, the arts, science and technology, and political history. The course also introduces geography concepts and skills within the context of the historical narrative. Online lessons and assessments complement World History: Our Human Story, a textbook written and published by K12. Students are challenged to consider topics in depth as they analyse primary sources and maps, create time-lines, and complete other projects—practising advanced historical thinking and writing skills as they explore the broad themes and big ideas of human history. Students complete an independent honours project each semester.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: World History: Our Human Story

Prerequisites: K12 middle school American History A, World History A or World History B (or equivalents)

HST203: MODERN WORLD STUDIES (COMPREHENSIVE)

In this comprehensive course, students follow the history of the world from approximately 1870 to the present. They begin with a study of events leading up to 1914, including the Second Industrial Revolution and the imperialism that accompanied it. Their focus then shifts to the contemporary era, including two world wars, the Great Depression, and global Cold War tensions. Students examine both the staggering problems and astounding accomplishments of the twentieth century, with a focus on political and social history. Students also explore topics in physical and human geography, and investigate issues of concern in the contemporary world. Online lessons help students organize study, explore topics, review in preparation for assessments, and practice sophisticated skills of historical thinking and analysis. Activities include analysing primary sources and maps, creating time-lines, completing projects and written assignments, and conducting independent research.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: The Human Odyssey, Volume 3

Prerequisites: K12 middle school Intermediate World History A and B (or equivalents)


HST204: honourS MODERN WORLD STUDIES

In this advanced course, students investigate the history of the world from approximately 1870 to the present. They begin with an analysis of events leading up to 1914, including the Second Industrial Revolution and the imperialism that accompanied it. Their focus then shifts to the contemporary era, including two world wars, the Great Depression, and global Cold War tensions. Students undertake an in-depth examination of both the staggering problems and astounding accomplishments of the twentieth century, with a focus on political and social history. Students also explore advanced topics in physical and human geography, and investigate issues of concern in the contemporary world. Activities include analysing primary sources and maps, creating time-lines, completing projects and written assignments, and conducting research. Students complete independent projects each semester.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: The Human Odyssey, Volume 3

Prerequisites: K12 middle school Intermediate World History A and B (or equivalents), success in previous social studies course, and teacher/school counsellor recommendation



HST303: U.S. HISTORY (COMPREHENSIVE)

This course is a full-year survey that provides students with a comprehensive view of American history from the first migrations of nomadic people to North America to recent events. Readings are drawn from K12’s The American Odyssey: A History of the United States. Online lessons help students organize their study, explore topics in depth, review in preparation for assessments, and practice skills of historical thinking and analysis. Activities include analysing primary sources and maps, creating time lines, completing projects and written assignments, and conducting independent research.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: The American Odyssey: A History of the United States

Prerequisites: HST103: World History or HST203: Modern World Studies (or equivalents)


HST304: honourS U.S. HISTORY

This course is a challenging full-year survey that provides students with a comprehensive view of American history from the first migrations of nomadic people to North America to recent events. Readings are drawn from K12’s The American Odyssey: A History of the United States. Online lessons help students organize their study, explore topics in depth, review in preparation for assessments, and practice advanced skills of historical thinking and analysis. Activities include analysing primary sources and maps, creating time-lines, completing projects and written assignments, and conducting independent research. Students complete independent projects each semester.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: The American Odyssey: A History of the United States

Prerequisites: HST103 or HST104 (Honours): World History, or HST203 or HST204 (Honours): Modern World Studies (or equivalents), and teacher/school counsellor recommendation

 

HST313: MODERN U.S. HISTORY (COMPREHENSIVE)

This course is a full-year survey that provides students with a comprehensive view of American history from the industrial revolution of the late nineteenth century to recent events. Readings are drawn from K12’s The American Odyssey: A History of the United States. Online lessons help students organize study, explore topics in-depth, review in preparation for assessments, and practice skills of historical thinking and analysis. Activities include analysing primary sources and maps, creating time-lines, completing projects and written assignments, and conducting independent research.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: The American Odyssey: A History of the United States

Prerequisites: K12 middle school American History A and American History B (or equivalents)


HST314: honourS MODERN U.S. HISTORY

This course is a challenging full-year survey that provides students with a comprehensive view of American history from the industrial revolution of the late nineteenth century to recent events. Readings are drawn from K12’s The American Odyssey: A History of the United States. Online lessons help students organize study, explore topics in depth, review in preparation for assessments, and practice advanced skills of historical thinking and analysis. Activities include analysing primary sources and maps, creating time-lines, completing projects and written assignments, and conducting independent research. Students complete independent projects each semester.

Course Length: Two semesters

Materials: The American Odyssey: A History of the United States

Prerequisites: K12 middle school American History A and American History B (or equivalents) and teacher/school counsellor recommendation


HST403: U.S. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS (COMPREHENSIVE)

This course studies the history, organization, and functions of the United States government. Beginning with the Declaration of Independence and continuing through to the present day, students explore the relationship between individual Americans and our governing bodies. Students take a close look at the political culture of our country and gain insight into the challenges faced by citizens, elected government officials, political activists, and others. Students also learn about the roles of political parties, interest groups, the media, and the Supreme Court, and discuss their own views on current political issues.

Course Length: One semester
Prerequisites: HST303: U.S. History (or equivalent) is recommended, but not required


HST413: U.S. AND GLOBAL ECONOMICS (COMPREHENSIVE)

In this course on economic principles, students explore choices they face as producers, consumers, investors, and taxpayers. Students apply what they learn to real-world simulation problems. Topics of study include markets from historic and contemporary perspectives; supply and demand; theories of early economic philosophers such as Adam Smith and David Ricardo; theories of value; money (what it is, how it evolved, the role of banks, investment houses, and the Federal Reserve); Keynesian economics; how capitalism functions, focusing on productivity, wages, investment, and growth; issues of capitalism, such as unemployment, inflation, and the national debt; and a survey of markets in such areas as China, Europe, and the Middle East.

Course Length: One semester

Prerequisites: HST403: U.S. Government and Politics (or equivalent) is recommended, but not required


HST500: AP U.S. HISTORY

Students explore and analyse the economic, political, and social transformation of the United States since the time of the first European encounters. Students are asked to master not only the wide array of factual information necessary to do well on the AP exam, but also to practice skills of critical analysis of historical information and documents. Students read primary and secondary source materials and analyse problems presented by historians to gain insight into challenges of interpretation and the ways in which historical events have shaped American society and culture. The content aligns to the sequence of topics recommended by the College Board and to widely used textbooks. Students prepare for the AP exam.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: America: A Narrative History, by Tindal et al., 8th ed; other editions acceptable

Prerequisites: Success in previous history course and teacher/school counsellor recommendation

 

HST510: AP U.S. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS

This course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level course. Students explore the operations and structure of the U.S. government and the behaviour of the electorate and politicians. Students gain the analytical perspective necessary to evaluate political data, hypotheses, concepts, opinions, and processes and learn how to gather data about political behaviour and develop their own theoretical analysis of American politics. Students also build the skills they need to examine general propositions about government and politics, and to analyse specific relationships between political, social, and economic institutions. Students prepare for the AP exam and for further study in political science, law, education, business, and history.

Course Length: One semester

Materials: The Lanahan Readings in the American Polity, 5th ed.; American Government, by Lowi et al., 12th ed.; other editions acceptable

Prerequisites: Success in HST304: Honours U.S. History (or equivalent) and teacher/school counsellor recommendation


HST520: AP MACROECONOMICS

This course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level course. Students learn why and how the world economy can change from month to month, how to identify trends in our economy, and how to use those trends to develop performance measures and predictors of economic growth or decline. Students also examine how individuals and institutions are influenced by employment rates, government spending, inflation, taxes, and production. Students prepare for the AP exam and for further study in business, political science, and history.

Course Length: One semester

Materials: Macroeconomics for Today, 4th Ed., ISBN: 0-324-30197-9

Prerequisites: MTH304: MTH304: Honours Algebra II (or equivalent) and teacher/school counsellor recommendation


HST530: AP MICROECONOMICS

This course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level course. Students explore the behaviour of individuals and businesses as they exchange goods and services in the marketplace. Students learn why the same product can cost different amounts at different stores, in different cities, and at different times. Students also learn to spot patterns in economic behaviour and learn how to use those patterns to explain buyer and seller behaviour under various conditions. Lessons promote an understanding of the nature and function of markets, the role of scarcity and competition, the influence of factors such as interest rates on business decisions, and the role of government in the economy. Students prepare for the AP exam and for further study in business, history, and political science.

Course Length: One semester

Materials: Microeconomics for Today, 4th Ed., ISBN: 0-324-30192-8

Prerequisites: Success in MTH304: Honours Algebra II (or equivalent) and teacher/school counsellor recommendation


HST540: AP PSYCHOLOGY

This course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level course. Students receive an overview of current psychological research methods and theories. They explore the therapies used by professional counsellor and clinical psychologists, and examine the reasons for normal human reactions: how people learn and think, the process of human development and human aggression, altruism, intimacy, and self-reflection. They study core psychological concepts, such as the brain and sensory functions, and learn to gauge human reactions, gather information, and form meaningful syntheses. Students prepare for the AP Exam and for further studies in psychology and life sciences.

Course Length: One semester

Materials: Psychology by David G. Myers, 9th ed.

Prerequisites: Success in SCI204: Honours Biology (or equivalent) and teacher/school counsellor recommendation


HST550: AP EUROPEAN HISTORY

This course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level course. It explores political, diplomatic, social, economic, cultural, and intellectual themes in European history from 1450 to the present. Students cultivate higher-order thinking and writing skills that are assessed through essays, various writing activities, quizzes, and tests. They apply their historical analysis during threaded discussions, mock trials, and an Enlightenment Salon. The course scope and rigor helps prepare students for the AP European History Exam along with further study in the humanities.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Prerequisites: Success in previous history course and teacher/school counsellor recommendation


 

HST560: AP WORLD HISTORY

This course spans the Neolithic age to the present in a rigorous academic format organized by chronological periods and viewed through fundamental concepts and course themes. Students analyse the causes and processes of continuity and change across historical periods. Themes include human-environment interaction, cultures, expansion and conflict, political and social structures, and economic systems. In addition to mastering historical content, students cultivate historical thinking skills that involve crafting arguments based on evidence, identifying causation, comparing and supplying context for events and phenomenon, and developing historical interpretation.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: Siddhartha by Herman Hesse, King Leopold’s Ghost: A Story of Greed, Terror, and Heroism in Colonial Africa by Adam Hochschild (supplied by school or student)

Prerequisites: Success in previous history course and teacher/school counsellor recommendation


WORLD LANGUAGE COURSES  (These courses fulfill the World Language Credit Requirement)


WLG100: SPANISH I (NEW)

Students begin their introduction to Spanish by focusing on the four key areas of foreign language study: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in simple conversations and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts, analyse and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Spanish-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: A speaker and microphone are necessary; a headset combination is recommended. Vox Everyday Spanish and English Dictionary or equivalent is recommended.

Note: Students who have already completed Middle School Spanish 2 should enroll in Spanish II rather than in Spanish I.

 

WLG200: SPANISH II (NEW)

Students continue their study of Spanish by further expanding their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. Students not only begin to comprehend listening and reading passages more fully, but they also start to express themselves more meaningfully in both speaking and writing. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns in their speaking and writing, participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts, analyse and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Spanish-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. By semester 2, the course is conducted almost entirely in Spanish. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.
 

Materials: A speaker and microphone are necessary; a headset combination is recommended. Vox Everyday Spanish and English Dictionary or equivalent is recommended.

Prerequisites: WLG100: Spanish I, middle school Spanish 1 and 2 (or equivalents)



WLG300: SPANISH III (NEW)

Students further deepen their understanding of Spanish by focusing on the three modes of communication: interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational. Each unit consists of a variety of activities which teach the students how to understand more difficult written and spoken passages, to communicate with others through informal speaking and writing interactions, and to express their thoughts and opinions in more formal spoken and written contexts. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, use correct vocabulary terms and phrases naturally, incorporate a wide range of grammar concepts consistently and correctly while speaking and writing, participate in conversations covering a wide range of topics and respond appropriately to conversational prompts, analyse and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Spanish-speaking countries, read and analyse important pieces of Hispanic literature, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course is conducted almost entirely in Spanish. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: A speaker and microphone are necessary; a headset combination is recommended. Vox Everyday Spanish and English Dictionary or equivalent is recommended.

Prerequisites: WLG200: Spanish II (or equivalent)


WLG400-AVT: SPANISH IV

Fourth-year Spanish expands on the foundation of Spanish grammar and vocabulary that students acquired in the first three courses. As with all the earlier offerings, this culminating-level Spanish language course conforms to the standards of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). Students continue to sharpen their speaking, listening, reading and writing skills while also learning to express themselves on topics relevant to Spanish culture. The two-semester course is divided into ten units whose themes include people, achievements, wishes and desires, activities, celebrations, possibilities, the past, the arts, current events, and wrap up and review.


Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: A speaker and microphone are necessary; a headset combination is recommended. Vox Everyday Spanish and English Dictionary or equivalent is recommended.

Prerequisites: WLG300: Spanish III (or equivalent)

 

WLG500: AP SPANISH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE (NEW)

The AP Spanish Language and Culture course is an advanced language course in which students acquire proficiencies that expand their cognitive, analytical and communicative skills. The AP Spanish Language and Culture course prepares students for the College Board’s AP Spanish Language and Culture exam. It uses as its foundation the three modes of communication (Interpersonal, Interpretive and Presentational) as defined in the Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century. The course is designed as an immersion experience and is conducted almost exclusively in Spanish. In addition, all student work, practices, projects, participation, and assessments are in Spanish. The course is based on the six themes required by the College Board: (1) global challenges, (2) science and technology, (3) contemporary life, (4) personal and public identities, (5) families and communities, and (6) beauty and aesthetics. The course teaches language structures in context and focuses on the development of fluency to convey meaning. Students explore culture in both contemporary and historical contexts to develop an awareness and appreciation of cultural products, practices, and perspectives. In addition, students participate in a forum where they are able to share their own opinions and comments about various topics and comment on other students' posts. The course also makes great use of the Internet for updated and current material.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: A speaker and microphone are necessary; a headset combination is recommended. Vox Everyday Spanish and English Dictionary or equivalent is recommended.

Prerequisites: Strong success in WLG300: Spanish III, or success in WLG400-AVT: Spanish IV (or equivalents), and teacher/school counsellor recommendation



WLG110: FRENCH I (NEW)

Students begin their introduction to French by focusing on the four key areas of foreign language study: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in simple conversations and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts, analyse and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various French-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: A speaker and microphone are necessary; a headset combination is recommended. Larousse Student French-English/English-French Dictionary or equivalent is recommended.

Prerequisites: None

Note: Students who have already completed Middle School French 2 should enroll in French II rather than in French I.

 

WLG210: FRENCH II (NEW)

Students continue their study of French by further expanding their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. Students not only begin to comprehend listening and reading passages more fully, but they also start to express themselves more meaningfully in both speaking and writing. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns in their speaking and writing, participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts, analyse and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various French-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. By semester 2, the course is conducted almost entirely in French. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: A speaker and microphone are necessary; a headset combination is recommended. Larousse Student French-English/English-French Dictionary or equivalent is recommended.

Prerequisites: WLG110: French I, middle school French 1 and 2 (or equivalents)


 

WLG310: FRENCH III (NEW)

Each unit consists of a variety of activities which teach the students how to understand more difficult written and spoken passages, to communicate with others through informal speaking and writing interactions, and to express their thoughts and opinions in both formal and Informal spoken and written contexts. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, use correct vocabulary terms and phrases naturally, incorporate a wide range of grammar concepts consistently and correctly while speaking and writing, participate in conversations covering a wide range of topics, respond appropriately to conversational prompts, analyse and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various French-speaking countries, read and analyse important pieces of literature, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course is conducted almost entirely in French. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: A speaker and microphone are necessary; a headset combination is recommended. Larousse Student French-English/English-French Dictionary or equivalent is recommended.

Prerequisites: WLG210: French II (or equivalent)

 


WLG410-AVT: FRENCH IV

Students complete their high school French language education with this two-semester course that, like all of its predecessors, conforms to the national standards of the ACTFL. The instructional material in French IV enables students to use the conditional and subjunctive tenses, and talk about the past with increasing ease, distinguishing which tense to use and when. It also helps students hone their listening skills to enhance their understanding of native speech patterns on familiar topics. Students expand their knowledge of French-speaking countries' culture, history, and geography and learn about francophone contributions in the arts. Students must pass French III as a prerequisite.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: A speaker and microphone are necessary; a headset combination is recommended. Larousse Student French-English/English-French Dictionary or equivalent is recommended.

Prerequisites: WLG310: French III (or equivalent)


WLG510: AP FRENCH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE (NEW)

The AP French Language and Culture course is an advanced language course in which students are directly prepared for the AP French Language and Culture test. It uses as its foundation the three modes of communication: interpersonal, interpretive and presentational. The course is conducted almost exclusively in French. The course is based on the six themes required by the College Board: (1) global challenges, (2) science and technology, (3) contemporary life, (4) personal and public identities, (5) families and communities, and (6) beauty and aesthetics. The course teaches language structures in context and focuses on the development of fluency to convey meaning. Students explore culture in both contemporary and historical contexts to develop an awareness and appreciation of cultural products, practices, and perspectives. Students should expect to listen to, read, and understand a wide-variety of authentic French-language materials and sources, demonstrate proficiency in interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational communication using French, gain knowledge and understanding of the cultures of the Francophone world, use French to connect with other disciplines and expand knowledge in a wide-variety of contexts, develop insight into the nature of the French language and its culture, and use French to participate in communities at home and around the world. The AP French Language course is a college level course. The intensity, quality, and amount of course material can be compared to that of a third-year college course.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: A speaker and microphone are necessary; a headset combination is recommended. Larousse Student French-English/English-French Dictionary or equivalent is recommended.

Prerequisites: Strong success in WLG310: French III, or success in WLG410-AVT: French IV (or equivalents), and teacher/school counsellor recommendation


WLG120: GERMAN I (NEW)

Students begin their introduction to German by focusing on the four key areas of foreign language study: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in simple conversations, respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts, analyse and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various German-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Note: Students who have already completed Middle School German 2 should enrol in German II rather than in German I.


Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: A speaker and microphone are necessary; a headset combination is recommended. Larousse German Dictionary or equivalent is recommended.

Prerequisites: None

Note: Students who have already succeeded in middle school German 2 should enrol in German II rather than in German I.


WLG220: GERMAN II (NEW)

Students continue their study of German by further expanding their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. Students not only begin to comprehend listening and reading passages more fully, but they also start to express themselves more meaningfully in both speaking and writing. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns in their speaking and writing, participate in conversations, respond appropriately to conversational prompts, analyse and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various German-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: A speaker and microphone are necessary; a headset combination is recommended. Larousse German Dictionary or equivalent is recommended.

Prerequisites: WLG120: German I, middle school German 1 and 2 (or equivalents)


WLG320-AVT: GERMAN III

This course expands the scope of concepts and information that students mastered in the German I and II courses and aligns with national ACTFL standards. Students learn increasingly complex grammatical constructions, such as present, imperfect, perfect, and future tenses; reflexive and modal verbs; prepositions; conjunctions; relative pronouns; and adjective endings. Unit themes in this two-semester course include vacations, travel, leisure time, healthy living, body parts and ailments, family members, rights and responsibilities, household chores, university study, military service, personal relationships, the importance of appearance, emotions, fairy tales, and animals. Unit activities blend different forms of communication and culture.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: LA speaker and microphone are necessary; a headset combination is recommended. Larousse German Dictionary or equivalent is recommended.

Prerequisites: WLG220: German II (or equivalent)


WLG420-AVT: GERMAN IV

German IV builds on the foundation of the first three courses. Students continue to sharpen their speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills while also learning to express themselves on topics relevant to German culture. Authentic texts, current culture, and literature from Germany, Austria, and Switzerland all form part of the instructional material for this course. Each unit focuses on a particular region or city and includes such themes as culture, tourism, and current events. These units cover topics such as contemporary and classical music, expressing opinion, German history, transportation, family weekend travel, shopping, free-time activities, technology, multiculturalism, education, and careers.

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: A speaker and microphone are necessary; a headset combination is recommended. Larousse German Dictionary or equivalent is recommended.

Prerequisites: WLG320-AVT: German III (or equivalent)


WLG130: LATIN I (NEW)

Since mastering a classical language presents different challenges from learning a spoken world language, students learn Latin through ancient, time-honoured, classical language approaches which include repetition, parsing, written composition, and listening exercises. These techniques, combined with a modern multimedia approach to learning grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, provide students with a strong foundation for learning Latin. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading comprehension activities, writing activities, multimedia culture, history, and mythology presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on engaging with authentic classical Latin through weekly encounters with ancient passages from such prestigious authors as Virgil, Ovid, and Lucretius. The curriculum concurs with the Cambridge school of Latin; therefore, students will learn ancient high classical styles of pronunciation and grammar in lieu of generally less sophisticated medieval styles, making it possible for students to comprehend the most Latin from the widest range of time periods. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns, understand and analyse the cultural and historical contexts of the ancient sources they study, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: A speaker and microphone are necessary; a headset combination is recommended. Bantam New College Latin & English Dictionary or equivalent is recommended.

Prerequisites: None

Note: Students who have already completed Middle School Latin 2 should enrol in Latin II rather than in Latin I.

 

WLG230: LATIN II (NEW)

Students continue with their study of Latin through ancient, time-honoured, classical language approaches which include repetition, parsing, written composition, and listening exercises. These techniques, combined with a modern multimedia approach to learning grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, prepare students for a deeper study of Latin. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading comprehension activities, writing activities, multimedia culture, history, and mythology presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. The emphasis is on reading Latin through engaging with myths from the ancient world which are presented in Latin. The curriculum concurs with the Cambridge school of Latin; therefore, students will learn ancient high classical styles of pronunciation and grammar in lieu of generally less sophisticated medieval styles, making it possible for students to comprehend the most Latin from the widest range of time periods. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, understand and use common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns, understand and analyse the cultural and historical contexts of the ancient sources they study, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.
Materials: A speaker and microphone are necessary; a headset combination is recommended. Bantam New College Latin & English Dictionary or equivalent is recommended.

Prerequisites: WLG130: Latin I (or equivalent)

 

WLG140: CHINESE I (NEW)

Students begin their introduction to Chinese by focusing on the four key areas of foreign language study: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Both Chinese characters and pinyin are presented together throughout the course and specific character practices are introduced after the first quarter. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in simple conversations and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts, analyse and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Chinese-speaking regions, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: A speaker and microphone are necessary; a headset combination is recommended. Oxford Beginner’s Chinese Dictionary or equivalent is recommended.

Prerequisites: None

Note: Students who have already completed Middle School Chinese 2 should enroll in Chinese II rather than in Chinese I.



WLG240: CHINESE II (NEW)


Students continue their study of Chinese by further expanding their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. Students not only begin to comprehend listening and reading passages more fully, but they also start to express themselves more meaningfully in both speaking and writing. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Character recognition and practice are a key focus of the course and students are expected to learn several characters each unit. However, pinyin is still presented with characters throughout the course to aid in listening and reading comprehension. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns in their speaking and writing, participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts, analyse and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Chinese-speaking regions, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).


Course Length: Two semesters. Semesters A and B should be taken consecutively and not simultaneously.

Materials: A speaker and microphone are necessary; a headset combination is recommended. Oxford Beginner’s Chinese Dictionary or equivalent is recommended.

Prerequisites: WLG140: Chinese I, middle school Chinese 1 and 2 (or equivalents)



LIBERAL ARTS ELECTIVES

 

ART010: FINE ART (ELECTIVE)

This course combines art history, appreciation, and analysis, while engaging students in hands-on creative projects. Lessons introduce major periods and movements in art history while focusing on master-works and the intellectual, technical, and creative processes behind those works. Studio lessons provide opportunities for drawing, painting, sculpting, and other creative endeavour.

Course Length: Two semesters

Materials: One package of white clay; one set of acrylic paint; one set of round paintbrushes. Students should have some means of capturing an image of their projects with a digital camera, web-cam, or other imaging device.

Prerequisites: None

 

ART020: MUSIC APPRECIATION (ELECTIVE)

This course introduces students to the history, theory, and genres of music. The course explores the history of music, from the surviving examples of rudimentary musical forms through to contemporary pieces from around the world. The first semester covers early musical forms, classical music, and American jazz. The second semester presents modern traditions, including gospel, folk, soul, blues, Latin rhythms, rock and roll, and hip hop. The course explores the relationship between music and social movements and reveals how the emergent global society and the prominence of the Internet are making musical forms more accessible worldwide. To comply with certain state standards for the arts, a student “performance practicum” is required for full credit each semester. The performance practicum requirement can be met through participation in supervised instrumental or vocal lessons, church or community choirs, community musical performances, or any other structured program that meets at regular intervals and provides opportunities for students to build vocal and/or instrumental skills. Parents or guardians will be required to present their proposed practicum to the student's teachers for approval, and validate their children’s regular participation in the chosen performance practicum.

Course Length: Two semesters

Materials: Finale Notepad music notation software

Prerequisites: None


ENG010: JOURNALISM (ELECTIVE)

Students are introduced to the historical importance of journalism in America. They study the basic principles of print and online journalism as they examine the role of printed news media in our society. They learn investigative skills, responsible reporting, and journalistic writing techniques as they read, respond to, and write their own news and feature articles. Students conduct interviews, research, write, and design their own publications.

Course Length: One semester

Prerequisites: None

 

ENG020: PUBLIC SPEAKING (ELECTIVE)

Students are introduced to public speaking as an important component of their academic, work, and social lives. They study public speaking occasions and develop skills as fair and critical listeners, or consumers, of spoken information and persuasion. Students study types of speeches (informative, persuasive, dramatic, and special occasion), read and listen to models of speeches, and prepare and present their own speeches to diverse audiences. Students learn to choose speaking topics and adapt them for specific audiences, to research and support their ideas, and to benefit from listener feedback. They study how to incorporate well-designed visual and multimedia aids in presentations and how to maintain a credible presence in the digital world. Students also learn about the ethics of public speaking and about techniques for managing communication anxiety.

Course Length: One semester

Materials: Student must provide a web-cam and recording software

Prerequisites: None


HST010-APL: ANTHROPOLOGY (ELECTIVE)

Anthropologists research the characteristics and origins of the cultural, social, and physical development of humans and consider why some cultures change and others come to an end. In this course, students are introduced to the five main branches of anthropology: physical, cultural, linguistic, social, and archaeological. Through instruction and their own investigation and analysis, students explore these topics, considering their relationship to other social sciences such as history, geography, sociology, economics, political science, and psychology. Emulating professional anthropologists, students apply their knowledge and observational skills to the real-life study of cultures in the United States and around the world. The content in this course meets or exceeds the standards of the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS).

Course Length: One semester

Prerequisites: HST103: World History (or equivalent) recommended as a prerequisite or co-requisite, but not required


HST020-AVT: PSYCHOLOGY (ELECTIVE)

In this course, students investigate why human beings think and act the way they do. This is an introductory course that broadly covers several areas of psychology. Instructional material presents theories and current research for students to critically evaluate and understand. Each unit introduces terminology, theories, and research that are critical to the understanding of psychology and includes tutorials and interactive exercises. Students learn how to define and use key terms of psychology and how to apply psychological principles to their own lives. Unit topics in this one semester course include methods of study, biological basis for behaviour, learning and memory, development and individual differences, and psychological disorders.

Course Length: One semester

Prerequisites: None


ART500-AVT: AP ART HISTORY (ELECTIVE)

This course is designed to broaden student's knowledge of architecture, sculpture, painting, and other art forms within various historical and cultural contexts. In AP Art History, students identify and classify artworks from prehistory through the 20th century, formally analyse artworks by placing them in the historical context within which they were created, consider the visual traditions of the cultures that created artworks, and understand interdisciplinary and cultural influences on works of art. In addition to visual analysis, the course considers issues such as patronage, gender, and the functions and effects of artworks. This course uses a textbook. Prior art training is not necessary for enrolment.

Course Length: Two semesters
 

Materials: Gardner’s Art Through the Ages, 12th Edition (Fred S. Kleiner, Christin J. Mamiya)

Prerequisites: HST 103: World History (or equivalent) and teacher/school counsellor recommendation; prior art training is not required

 

HST050-AVT: SOCIOLOGY (ELECTIVE) (NEW)

Through this two-semester course, students explore human relationships in society. Instructional materials emphasize culture, social structure, the individual in society, institutions, and social inequality. Unit topics for the first semester include society and culture, what is sociology, the nature of culture, conformity and deviance, social structure, roles, relationships and groups, and social stratification. In the second semester, students learn about social institutions, the family, religion and education, government and economic systems, the individual in society, the early years, adolescence, the adult years, continuity and change, communities and change, social movements and collective behaviour, social problems, minorities and discrimination, poverty, crime, and problems of mass society. Students use a textbook for the course.

Course Length: Two semesters

Materials: Sociology: Study of Human Relationships, 6th edition by W. LaVerne Thomas; other editions acceptable

Prerequisites: None


ENTREPRENEURIAL ELECTIVES

 

BUS030: PERSONAL FINANCE (ELECTIVE)

In this introductory finance course, students learn basic principles of economics and best practices for managing their own finances. Students learn core skills in creating budgets, developing long-term financial plans to meet their goals, and making responsible choices about income and expenses. They gain a deeper understanding of capitalism and other systems so they can better understand their role in the economy of society. Students are inspired by experiences of finance professionals and stories of everyday people and the choices they make to manage their money.

Course Length: One semester

Prerequisites: None

 

BUS040: INTRODUCTION TO ENTREPRENEURSHIP I (ELECTIVE)

In this introductory business course, students learn the basics of planning and launching their own successful business. Whether they want to start their own money-making business or create a non-profit to help others, this course helps students develop the core skills they need to be successful. They learn how to come up with new business ideas, attract investors, market their business, and manage expenses. Students hear inspirational stories of teen entrepreneurs who have turned their ideas into reality, and then they plan and execute their own business.

Course Length: One semester

Prerequisites: None

 

BUS050: INTRODUCTION TO ENTREPRENEURSHIP II (ELECTIVE)

Students build on the business concepts they learned in Introduction to Entrepreneurship I. They learn about sales methods, financing and credit, accounting, pricing, and government regulations. They refine their technology and communication skills in speaking, writing, networking, negotiating, and listening. They enhance their employability skills by preparing job-related documents, developing interviewing skills, and learning about hiring, firing, and managing employees. Students develop a complete business plan and a presentation for potential investors.

Course Length: One semester

Prerequisites: BUS040: Introduction to Entrepreneurship I (or equivalent)


BUS060: INTRODUCTION TO MARKETING I (ELECTIVE)

Students find out what it takes to market a product or service in today’s fast-paced business environment. They learn the fundamentals of marketing using real-world business examples. They learn about buyer behaviour, marketing research principles, demand analysis, distribution, financing, pricing, and product management.

Course Length: One semester

Prerequisites: None


BUS070: INTRODUCTION TO MARKETING II (ELECTIVE)

Students build on the skills and concepts learned in Introduction to Marketing I to develop a basic understanding of marketing principles and techniques. By the end of the course, they will have developed their own comprehensive marketing plan for a new business.

Course Length: One semester

Prerequisites: BUS060: Introduction to Marketing I (or equivalent)

 

MTH342-AVT: ACCOUNTING (ELECTIVE)

Through this course, students gain a foundation in the skills needed for college accounting courses, office work, and managing their own small businesses. This introduction to accounting gives students who have never had prior accounting training an overview of the three forms of accounting: financial, cost, and management accounting. The course helps build an appreciation for the role of accounting in managing a profitable business. Instructional material covers the basic concepts, conventions, and rules of the double entry system and includes techniques for analysing ratios from a balance sheet. The concept of ethics, integrity, and confidentiality are woven through all the units.

Course Length: Two semesters

Prerequisites: MTH122: Algebra I (or equivalent)

 

HST030-AVT: ECONOMICS (ELECTIVE)

Students are introduced to the basics of economic principles, and learn how to think like economists. They explore different economic systems, including the American free enterprise system, analyse and interpret data, and consider economic applications in today’s world. From economics in the world of business, money, banking, and finance, students see how economics is applied both domestically and globally. Students take diagnostic tests that assess their current knowledge and generate individualized study plans, so students can focus on topics that need review. Audio readings and vocabulary lists in English and Spanish support reading comprehension.

Course Length: One semester

Prerequisites: None


SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ELECTIVES

 

SCI010: ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (ELECTIVE)

This course surveys key topic areas including the application of scientific process to environmental analysis; ecology; energy flow; ecological structures; earth systems; and atmospheric, land, and water science. Topics also include the management of natural resources and analysis of private and governmental decisions involving the environment. Students explore actual case studies and conduct five hands-on, unit-long research activities, learning that political and private decisions about the environment and the use of resources require accurate application of scientific processes, including proper data collection and responsible conclusions.

Course Length: One semester
 

Prerequisites: Success in previous high school science course and teacher/school counsellor recommendation


SCI030: FORENSIC SCIENCE (ELECTIVE)

This course surveys key topics in forensic science, including the application of the scientific process to forensic analysis, procedures and principles of crime scene investigation, physical and trace evidence, and the law and courtroom procedures from the perspective of the forensic scientist. Through online lessons, virtual and hands-on labs, and analysis of fictional crime scenarios, students learn about forensic tools, technical resources, forming and testing hypotheses, proper data collection, and responsible conclusions.

Course Length: One semester

Prerequisites: Successful completion of at least two years of high school science including SCI203: Biology (or equivalent) and SCI303: Chemistry (or equivalent)


TCH010: COMPUTER LITERACY (ELECTIVE)

Today’s students must be able to effectively use technology to research, organize, create, and evaluate information. This course provides a foundation in the skills and concepts that define computer literacy in the twenty-first century. From the basics of keyboarding to Internet research techniques, document creation, and digital citizenship, students practice essential skills through hands-on projects.

Course Length: One semester

Software: OpenOffice.org version 3.2; Mozilla Firefox; Adobe Reader; Adobe Flash Player; 7-Zip compression program (all available by free download within the course)

System Requirements: Microsoft Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7, or Mac OS X 10.4 or higher operating system; for Windows, 256 MB of memory (RAM), 650 MB available hard drive space, and a 1024 x 768 or higher monitor resolution; for Mac OSX, an Intel processor, 512 MB of memory (RAM), 400 MB available disk space, and a 1024 x 768 or higher monitor resolution

Prerequisites: None

 

TCH026: AUDIO ENGINEERING (ELECTIVE)

In this introductory course, students learn about the physics of sound and the history of recording technologies. They learn about the four stages of professional music recording projects: recording, editing, mixing, and mastering. Using Audacity, an open-source recording and mixing program, they practice the techniques used by sound engineers to produce multi-track recordings. Through a series of engaging hands-on projects, they learn the fundamental concepts of audio engineering.

Course Length: One semester

Software: Audacity version 1.3.11; Adobe Reader; Adobe Flash Player; 7-Zip compression program (all available by free download within the course)

System Requirements: Microsoft Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7, or Mac OS X 10.4 or higher operating system; for Windows XP and Vista Home Basic, a 1 GHz or faster processor; for Windows Vista Home Premium/Business/Ultimate and Windows 7, a 2 GHz or faster processor; for Mac OS X, a 300 MHz or faster processor; for XP, 512 MB of memory (RAM); for Vista Home Basic, 2 GB; for Vista Home Premium/Business/Ultimate and for Windows 7, 4 GB; for Mac OS X, 64 MB; at least 4 GB of available hard drive space

Prerequisites: None


TCH027: GREEN DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY (ELECTIVE)

This course examines the impact of human activities on sustainability while exploring the basic principles and technologies that support sustainable design. Students learn about the potential for emerging energy technologies such as water, wind, and solar power. They find out how today’s businesses are adapting to the increased demand for sustainable products and services. In this course, students develop a comprehensive understanding of this fast-growing field.

Course Length: One semester

Prerequisites: None

 

TCH028: DIGITAL ARTS I (ELECTIVE)

In this exploratory course, students learn the elements and principles of design, as well as foundational concepts of visual communication. While surveying a variety of media and art, students use image editing, animation, and digital drawing to put into practice the art principles they’ve learned. They explore career opportunities in the design, production, display, and presentation of digital artwork. They respond to the artwork of others, and learn how to combine artistic elements to create finished pieces that effectively communicate their ideas.

Course Length: One semester

Software: Inkscape version 0.47-3; Adobe Reader; Adobe Flash Player; 7-Zip compression program (all available by free download within the course)

System Requirements: Microsoft Windows XP, Windows Vista, or Mac OS X 10.3 or higher operating system, 1 GHz or faster processor; at least 512 MB of memory (RAM); at least 1 GB of available hard drive space

Prerequisites: None

 

TCH029: DIGITAL ARTS II (ELECTIVE)

Students build on the skills and concepts they learned in Digital Arts I as they develop their vocabulary of digital design elements. By the end of the course, they will have created a collection of digital art projects for their digital design portfolio.

Course Length: One semester

Software: Inkscape version 0.47-3; Adobe Reader; Adobe Flash Player; 7-Zip compression program (all available by free download within the course)

System Requirements: Microsoft Windows XP, Windows Vista, or Mac OS X 10.3 or higher operating system, 1 GHz or faster processor; at least 512 MB of memory (RAM); at least 1 GB of available hard drive space

Prerequisites: TCH028: Digital Arts I (or equivalent)

 

TCH030: IMAGE DESIGN AND EDITING (ELECTIVE)

This is the perfect course for anyone who wants to create compelling, professional looking graphic designs and photos. Students learn the basics of composition, color, and layout before moving on to technical topics like working with layers and masks, adding special effects, and effectively using typefaces to create visual impact. At the end of this course, students will have a variety of original projects for their graphic design portfolio.
Course Length: One semester

Software: GIMP version 2.6.6; Adobe Reader; Adobe Flash Player; 7-Zip compression program (all available by free download within the course)

System Requirements: Microsoft Windows XP, Windows Vista; 400 MHz or faster processor; 512 MB of memory (RAM); at least 2 GB of available hard drive space

Prerequisites: None

 

TCH036: COMPUTER SCIENCE (ELECTIVE)

This course introduces students to computer science concepts such as computer architecture, networks, and the Internet. Students use object-oriented programming, event-driven processes, modular computer programming, and data manipulation algorithms to produce finished software programs. They use the design process to create many programs by determining specifications, designing the software, and testing and improving the product until it meets the specifications. By the end of this course, students will have a solid foundation for further study in this subject.

Course Length: One semester

Software: Python 3.2; Adobe Reader; Adobe Flash Player; 7-Zip compression program (all available by free download within the course)

System Requirements: Microsoft Windows operating system Windows XP, Windows Vista, or Windows 7 recommended; at least 100 MB of available hard drive space

Prerequisites: MTH122: Algebra I (or equivalent)

 

 

TCH038: ENGINEERING DESIGN /CAD (ELECTIVE)

Computer-aided design systems are used by designers and manufacturers in virtually every industry to create engineering design solutions. In this course, students are introduced to engineering, learning the basics of CAD software: creating points, lines, other geometric forms, isometric drawings, and 3D models. They learn how to translate initial concepts into functional designs and 3D walk-through and explore career options in this hands-on introductory-level course.

Course Length: One semester
 

Software: CAD Standard Lite 370; Google SketchUp 7.1; Adobe Reader; Adobe Flash Player; 7-Zip compression program (all available by free download within the course)

System Requirements: Microsoft Windows XP or Windows Vista operating system; 600 MHz or faster processor (1 GHz for Vista); 512 MB of memory (RAM) (1 GB for Vista); at least 2 GB of available hard drive space; 3D class video card with 128 MB of memory or higher (256 MB for Vista)—the video card driver must support OpenGL version 1.5 or higher

Prerequisites: None

 

TCH040: WEB DESIGN (ELECTIVE)

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the essentials of Web design, from planning page layouts to publishing a complete site to the Web. Through real world design scenarios and hands-on projects, students create compelling, usable websites using free tools.

Course Length: One semester

Software: KompoZer version 0.7.10; GIMP version 2.4.5; Adobe Reader; Adobe Flash Player; 7-Zip compression program (all available by free download within the course)

System Requirements: Microsoft Windows XP, Windows Vista, or Mac OS X operating system; 400 MHz or faster processor (must have a PowerPC processor, not Intel, for Mac OS X); 512 MB of memory (RAM); at least 2 GB of available hard drive space

Prerequisites: None

 

TCH060: C++ PROGRAMMING (ELECTIVE)

In this introductory course, students learn basic programming concepts through a series of hands-on projects. They also learn about software development careers, the software development process, and industry best practices. Using Microsoft Visual C++ 2008, students master the building blocks of programming: functions, variables, loops, arrays, and classes.

Course Length: One semester

Software: Microsoft Visual C++ 2008 Express; Adobe Reader; Adobe Flash Player; 7-Zip compression program (all available by free download within the course)
System Requirements: Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack 2 or Service Pack 3; Windows Vista or Windows Vista SP1, or Windows 7 operating system; 1 GHz or faster processor (1.6 GHz for Vista or Windows 7); 192 MB of memory (RAM) (748 MB for Vista or Windows 7); at least 1 GB of available hard drive space

Prerequisites: MTH122: Algebra I (or equivalent)

 

 

TCH061-AVT: PROGRAMMING I—VB.NET (ELECTIVE)

Students learn basic programming and the essential concepts of VisualBasic.net (VB. NET) in this one-semester course. As an introduction to VB.NET, students are taught the basic uses of the programming language, its similarities to the English language and others, its architecture, program flow, and its flexibility as a programming language. The course helps participants understand the processes involved in software development and object-oriented programming. This is an introductory course that could lead to careers such as software engineer, developer, or game designer. Prior coursework in computer fundamentals is a prerequisite. Visual Studio 2008 Express Edition is required software for this course.

Course Length: One semester

Software: Visual Basic 2008 Express Edition (available by free download within the course)

System Requirements: Ram: 512 MB, Processor: Pentium 600 MHz, Hard Disc: 2 GB, Operating System: Windows XP, Windows 2000, or Windows NT

Prerequisites: TCH036: Computer Science I or TCH060: C++ Programming

 

 

TCH062-AVT: PROGRAMMING II—JAVA (ELECTIVE)

This introductory-level, one-semester course is designed for people who have very little programming experience. In Java Programming, students gain an understanding of Java platforms and learn how to build a stand-alone application, such as a countdown clock or leap year indicator. Students also learn the techniques of Java and how Java can be used in cross-platform programming. At the end of the course, students are able to write basic programs using Java and are prepared to pursue further instruction in any programming language. Prior coursework in computer fundamentals and programming are prerequisites for Java Programming. JDK 1.5 or a higher version Java application is required for this course

Course Length: One semester
Software: Java Developer Kit (available by free download within the course)

System Requirements: Ram: 512 MB, Processor: Pentium 600 MHz, Hard Disc: 2 GB, Operating System: Windows XP, Windows 2000, or Windows NT

Prerequisites: TCH061-AVT: Programming I - VB.NET


TCH070: GAME DESIGN (ELECTIVE)

This course is for anyone who loves gaming and wants to design and build original games from scratch. Students learn how to use popular game-development software to create engaging, interactive games in a variety of styles. After learning about game genres, students learn about all aspects of the game-design process. From there, it’s on to a series of increasingly challenging hands-on projects that teach all the elements of successful game development.

Course Length: One semester

Software: Multimedia Fusion 2 (Standard) - This software is not provided by K12 and must be purchased independently.

System Requirements: Microsoft Windows XP or Windows Vista operating system; 1 GHz or faster processor; 256 MB of memory (RAM); at least 2 GB of available hard drive space

Prerequisites: MTH122: Algebra I (or equivalent)

 

TCH500-AVT: AP COMPUTER SCIENCE A (ELECTIVE)

AP Computer Science A is the equivalent of a first-semester, college-level course in computer science. The course emphasizes object-oriented programming methodology with a concentration on problem solving and algorithm development. It also includes the study of data structures, design, and abstraction. Students enrolling in AP Computer Science A should have knowledge of mathematics at the Algebra II level as well as some previous programming experience, a basic understanding of networks, and knowledge of the responsible use of computer systems (including system reliability, privacy, legal issues, intellectual property, and the social and ethical ramifications of computer use). To take this course, students need regular access to a computer system with recent technology.

Course Length: Two semesters

Materials: Java Developer Kit; BlueJ; e-book Java Au Naturel (all available by free download within the course)

System Requirements: at least 128 MB of memory
 

Prerequisites: Success in MTH304: Honours Algebra II (or equivalent), in addition to a previous programming course such as TCH060 C++ Programming, TCH061 Programming I VB.Net, or a programming course from another school.
JOURNEYS SYMPOSIUM

 

Entering a new school (and an on-line one to boot!) can be a difficult transition. The Middle and High School programs blend a robust on-line learning introduction as well as establishing academic, social, and emotional skills to best prepare students for success in Middle School, High School, and beyond. Students meet in on-line classrooms with their Instructor and classmates, and build a sense of community and camaraderie, as well as essential skill sets. The Middle School program is comprised of two consecutive year-long seminars.

GRADE 9: THE WRITER WITHIN: REFLECT, RESPOND, REAFFIRM

Students explore and evaluate their personal interests, habits, and preferences through writing exercises and guided experiences that give them greater insight into themselves and each other. Part of this “immersion in self-awareness” is an assessment of their learning styles and needs. Each student emerges with a concrete set of goals, as well as an initial college search plan.

GRADE 10: SERVICE TO A CAUSE: COMMUNITY, COMPASSION, COMMITMENT

Incorporating their developing self-awareness into the realm of team and community, students engage in a direct, hands-on service experience of their choice. Critical to this endeavour is in-depth analysis and reflection on the dynamics that lead to effective team action and community involvement. The result is a blueprint that students can use for skilful and responsible stewardship in the future.

GRADE 11: INSIGHTS INTO LEADERSHIP: VALOR, VISION, VOICES

Students continue to apply their sense of self and community by building—and telling—their own unique stories. This sixth year in the Symposium stresses the conviction that every individual adds a distinctive, vital chapter to the whole human story. Through an iterative series of writing challenges, presentations, and discussions, each student crafts a powerful personal narrative that can be used as his or her college essay.

GRADE 12: THE CAPSTONE PROJECT: ACHIEVEMENT INTO ACTION

This final “journey” includes a practical focus on the college application process, as well as a study of different leadership styles and theories as they apply to real-life situations. Students research, examine, and report on various examples of courage, motivation, influence, triumph, and legacy fulfilment—current and historical—made more immediate and relevant through their pursuit of a self-selected, hands-on leadership opportunity.